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Evaporative or Reverse Cycle Air Conditioning ... which is best?

Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Are you trying to make the decision between evaporative cooling and reverse cycle air conditioning and not sure which will be best for you?

It’s a big financial decision so you’ll want to get it right, so let’s take a look at both systems which may help you to decide.

Starting with the very basic differences evaporative systems cool only where as reverse cycle will both heat and cool. However you can combine gas ducted heating with evaporative cooling to warm you home which will give you the best of both worlds.

Evaporative cooling system works by drawing the warm air through water soaked pads thus cooling the air. This method works particularly well in drier climates like Western Australian and South Australia.

As they only require power to run the pump and a fan their running costs can be the equivalent as running a light globe. They are by far a less complex system to build and therefore cheaper to buy. The average purchase price and installation cost is roughly half that of a reverse cycle unit. In addition they are easy to maintain and repair and far more environmentally friendlier.

Reverse cycle air conditioning cools or heats the air inside the home and then recycles the air inside the house through a filter called the return air vent. For efficiency it’s best to keep all your external windows and door closed, that way you are not having to cool down or heat up air from outside.
With evaporative cooling you need to leave a window or screen door open to expel the warm air from the home and prevent a build up of moisture.

Certainly there are those who feel the constantly changing air is a good thing while others who suffer from hay fever and allergies might feel that recycling filtered air is better.

Reverse Cycle air conditioning work well in both dry and humid conditions. While they cost more purchase and install they do offer the convenience of both heating and cooling from one unit. It also means just one lot ductwork and grills. Another advantage of reverse cycle is that you can zone parts of the home so that you only cool or heat the parts you are using at the time.

The most important thing to remember is whichever you decide on, invest in a quality brand that is backed with a reputable manufactures guarantee. If you would like to know more check out our website or drop into a store and talk to one of the home climate solutions experts.

Evaporative or Refrigerated which is best?

Posted on Tuesday, February 09, 2016

Well there are certainly some inventive ideas there but seriously which is better Evaporative or Refrigerated. There are pros and cons for both. If you live in metropolitan Adelaide then there is an extremely good chance that there is gas running past your front door which you have access to economical gas for heating. The combination of ducted evaporative air cooling and ducted gas heating is an excellent marriage. (watch the Better Living Video titled Ducted Gas Heating and Evaporative Air Conditioning http://gasworks.net.au/the-better-living-blog/ducted-gas-heating-evaporative-air-conditioning-video).

Evaporative systems offer great cooling qualities at a very economical running  price. The cost to run a state of the art Breezair or Braemar evaporative system equated to the same as running a light globe. Another advantage of evaporative systems is that they constantly draw in fresh air and expel the old air rather than recycling the same air. To learn more about how evaporative air conditioning works watch the Better Living Video What is Evaporative Air Conditioning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6zWu_kd7t0  

Gas Works are Climate Masters of Seeley International and as such are experts when it comes to evaporative air conditioning. They offer an exclusive 7 year warranty on the unit and the installation so you can invest in your home with total peace of mind. With Gas Works being in SA for over 25 years you know it’s a name you can trust.

If you don’t have access to gas or you want the convenience of a single  system then ducted reverse cycle is for you. A reverse cycle system will both warm and cool your home at the touch of a button. A reverse cycle system as the name suggests recycles the cool/warm air around the home. To run the system most effectively it is best to keep all external door and windows shut. It is important to invest in a quality unit. You will find that reverse cycle  systems are covered by the energy star ratings. The more star the more efficient the system. To learn more about the energy star system check out the Better Living Video  Energy Star Ratings http://gasworks.net.au/the-better-living-blog/star-ratings-video

There are a number of well known brands like Dakin, Mitsubishi, Fujitsu, Samsung, Kelvinator, Rinnai, LG, Lennox and Panasonic. Gas Works have access to all major brands and are Panasonic Air Specialist Network Dealers which tells you they fully qualified to design and install system that is right for your home. Selecting the right size system is critical to the efficiency and effectiveness of the air conditioner. Too small a system and it will struggle to cool/heat your home, too big a system and your running cost will be higher than necessary. Watch the Better Living Video on What Size Air Conditioner Do I Need? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8UQ5frkCvY

If you are not sure what system will be best for you talk to your local Gas Works store you can be sure independent professional advice.

DIY Air conditioning, good idea or not?

Posted on Thursday, January 28, 2016

It’s been a long hot summer as predicted and it’s not over yet. We still have one third of summer still to come and we all know that March can also be hot. While we are currently experiencing some milder days just now, don’t lulled into a false sense of security.

When the temperature soars some people will do anything to get cool, as the video shows.

So you are thinking about air conditioning your home here are some things to think about:

1. Decision time – There are a number of different types of air conditioning from portable systems to fully ducted reverse cycle systems.Which will be best for you? You first need to decide what your needs are and what sort of budget you have. Your home is, for most, the biggest investment you have, so if you have the budget don’t scrimp. However if you only have a few hundred to spend then a portable unit may be better than nothing. It least it will allow you to sleep at night.

Next step up is a single room High Wall Spilt System Room air conditioner or an in window unit. While these will not cool multiple rooms it will effectively cool the intended area. From here your next step up is a ducted system and here again there are choices. You can select from either an evaporative system or refrigerated reverse cycle. Now there are pros and cons for each. Reverse cycle will heat you home in winter as well as cool it  in summer. Evaporative systems are cheaper to buy and run however will only cool you home. (see What is Evaporative Air Conditioning video) however evaporative can be teamed with ducted gas heating. (see Ducted Gas Heating and Evaporative Air Conditioning video)

2.Size – Yes it does matter when it comes to air conditioning. Too small a unit will struggle on the really hot days so far better to get a system that can cope than spend a less and be disappointed ( see What size air conditioning do I need video)

3 – It’s in the stars – Energy star ratings are there to guide you as to the efficiency of the unit. Remember no point in having  an air conditioning system if you can’t afford to run. For argument sake you may need a 6kw system to cool your home now the price will vary between brands.  As a rule of thumb the cheaper the unit the less efficient it will be.  (see Energy Star Rating video)

4 – Shop around – The only way you’ll if a price is realistic is if you shop around however it is critical that you compare apples with apples.

5 – Talk to those who install systems as well as sell them. The so called box moves just want to sell you a unit, where as someone who is going to sell you the unit and install it too has a vested interest in making sure you are buying the right unit in the first place.

Solar....Saviour or Sales Pitch

Posted on Wednesday, December 09, 2015

A recent report on the ABC Radio suggests that those who have solar power could pay 50% of those without. The average 3kw system will pay for itself in around 4-5 years.
Listen to ABC Podscast or read the transcript

http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2015/s4364877.htm

Energy investment of up to $1 trillion needed by 2050

MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: Australia's electricity networks will need up to a trillion dollars of investment by 2050, regardless of whether consumers are providing their own energy or buying it from the grid.

That's the view from the Energy Networks Association and the CSIRO, in an interim report aimed at helping the industry transform over the next decade.

They say the costs of solar energy and storage are falling faster than expected, but their increased use must be accompanied by changes to regulation and pricing, to protect vulnerable consumers who can't access new technologies.

From Canberra, Naomi Woodley reports.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The electricity industry is trying to see the future and in a market that's rapidly changing, the CEO of the Energy Networks Association, John Bradley is sure of one thing.

JOHN BRADLEY: We're expecting to see a lot more of the decision making being done by customers, and customers deciding what technology they install.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The association has teamed up with the CSIRO to develop a 10 year "roadmap" for the industry as it deals with the rise, and rise of solar panels.

JOHN BRADLEY: Provided we've got the pricing right and it's fair and efficient, then those people that are installing solar, they're not only taking up a new service that helps them take control of their energy use, they're also participating in the grid and helping to take pressure off the network.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The CSIRO has mapped out four different scenarios. One where consumers "set and forget" their energy needs, the rise of the actively involved consumer or "prosumer", another where people leave the grid altogether, and lastly a market of 100 per cent renewables.

The CSIRO's chief economist for energy is Paul Graham.

PAUL GRAHAM: By 2050 if you don't have solar you're going to be paying a bill somewhere around $2,000 a year, for the average consumer, but if you have solar, you'll to be paying a bill about a thousand dollars less.

NAOMI WOODLEY: More consumers are expected to install battery storage, and the current cost of storage and solar panels is 20 per cent lower than the CSIRO forecast it would be just two years ago, and it's continuing to fall.

Chief economist Paul Graham says that will help to drive down the cost of maintaining traditional networks.

PAUL GRAHAM: Where we have a lot of solar in the future, we need to add storage to that so we're not so reliant on the grid and the grid can be built more efficiently.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The Energy Network Association's John Bradley says despite the rapid change in the industry, there'll always be a need for a central grid.

JOHN BRADLEY: The best value they'll get out of their solar is usually by selling excess energy back into the market. For those reasons you need to have a grid in the middle which is enabling all the customer choices in that future energy system.

NAOMI WOODLEY: This report is the mid-way point of the roadmap program. The final report will be delivered in a year.

MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: Naomi Woodley with that report.
Source - ABC RADIO - AM with Michael Brissenden - 3rd December 2015

Want to know more about Solar Power check out the Better Living Video
http://gasworks.net.au/the-better-living-blog/tag/solar_power/

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